How to Serve a Subdomain as a Subdirectory

Let’s say you have a website built on a platform that excels at design and it’s available at example.com. But that platform falls short at blogging. So you think to yourself, “What if I could use a different blogging platform and make it available at example.com/blog?”

Most people would tell you that goes against how DNS and websites are supposed to work and to use a subdomain instead. But there are benefits to keeping your content on the root domain that we just don’t get with subdomains.

There’s a way to serve two different platforms on the same URL. And I’m going to show you the secret sauce so that, by the end of this article, we’ll make blog.example.com serve as example.com/blog.

Why you’d want to do this

Because you’re here, you probably already know why this is a path to pursue. But I’d like to ensure you are here for the primary reason to do this: SEO. Check out these 14 case studies that show positive results when people move their subdomains over to subdirectories. You want your blog and your domain to share SEO value. Putting it on a subdomain would somewhat disconnect the two.

This was my reason, and wound up merging two platforms, where the main domain was on WordPress and the subdomain was on Drupal. But this tutorial is platform agnostic — it’ll work with just about any platform.

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(By: Mike .. Date:2022-05-08 11:04:21)